About your Search

20130106
20130106
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the first african-american admitted to the university of mississippi in september 1962. this is about 60 meant -- 40 minutes. >> thank you, ralph, john. my gratitude to lover of congress for hosting the event. i will try to put into 30 minutes with happened to me 50 years yo was a reflection. this is my tenth but event says the book was published in september, and each event is different, its audience is different to me to the questions a different. i was a 23-year-old r.o.t.c. second lieutenant from a small liberal arts college in minnesota sent down to mississippi to -- along with 15 or 19,000 other federal soldiers to quell the riot, put down a riot. i was not aware what we are doing in order going because the county administration had put a clamp on public disclosure. not until we get too many since world -- memphis where we wear our mission. it was such a delicate, uncomfortable effort by our u.s. military, and it was a military -- often times a say was an army out of place. it was not our mission. military police said that mission sometimes, but they occurred every hundred years or
is asserting the right of the president of the united states to order the governor of mississippi and to restore order in a perilous situation, meredith is in danger of his life. parenthood, james meredith has been inspired to register for the university of mississippi when he heard president kennedy's inaugural address. so there's so much history in the air before playing the tape, tom leaned over and said i wish we could hear the chicken. the previous phone call, they're still talking about civil rights but their politician. governor barnett, at the end of a pretty intense call, said thank you for which it of our poultry program the president today, he stifles a laugh because he can't believe that this blowhard has just mentioned the poultry program. in the conversation we heard, they're not being polite anymore. they are not dancing around. they're going right into the. and the president is saying you have to do this. >> i should add a story. you know, in the south at that time governor barnett was sort of known as a bit of a dim bulb. [laughter] and two years before, during th
the bill with $150 million for fishery disasters alaska and mississippi because it has extra money added in for other disasters that are not sandy-related it slows the progress of the bill and absolutely, the $9.7 billion, which was to basically, to fund the -- allow the national fund insurance program to borrow from the treasury, additional amount had to be done. we had to keep, just like the debt ceiling, we have to keep the full faith and credit of the u.s. government and we have to make sure we pay our bills and people bought flood insurance policies and paid their premiums, we need to pay those off. >> diane, i want to talk about flood insurance in a second so hold what thought. >> we'll go back to what happened with speaker boehner. i think what we saw on display that day was the worst kind of politics and the kind of thing that really turns people off to government in general and particularly to the congress right now. john boehner was not so much concerned about the vote on the sandy relief package but he was concerned about the vote on his leadership and he was more interested i
and i took our first family vacation to georgia lee that, illinois, which is a koa koa city mississippi town. i found a rare book shelf and found a book full of newspaper. it was april 21st, 1865 "new york times" i was reading the about the lincoln's csh that triggered an intense passion for history i had never had. for the next five years it became a journey of meticulous of collecting of newspaper. i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient ak is eases to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access a lot of the originals that are found in the library and institution across the country. i made a point to collect them. much like my other historical collectible. they are available for sale or purchase. if any has seen "american pickers" i would say it's like that. i would say i'm like that more along the license of historic documents and newspaper. i'm traversing the earth trying to find and locate and take newspapers out of rare book shops and european book dealers and people dishoiferred them in at dicks and behind balls of old homes. it's an exc
here and supported alabama, i supported mississippi, i supported texas, i was hoping that by now the northeast part of this country would have -- congress would have acted. it's been 77 days. those people are hurting. people in my district still can't get back to their homes and here we are in the last congress we just didn't do anything about it. now we're moving forward and hopefully january 15 we can get the rest of the money so those people that are suffering from all these states hit by this storm can get their lives back together again and i thank you, i yield back. >> gentleman yields back. does the gentleman from new jersey continue to reserve? >> i yield one minute for his floor debate, the gentleman from new york, sean patrick maloney. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, my name is sean patrick maloney. i'm new here. i don't know all the rules of washington but it seems like the rule here is to put off till tomorrow what should be done today even when our fellow americans are suffering. a long time ago i honored from my mom and
of 3400 jobs. mississippi -- let's say that one more time. they added 13700 jobs, mostly in the mining, logging, and construction sector, but the unemployment rate is eight and a half%. here's the surprise. way out in the mountains. this city has set a bom recently. in the middle of 2012 the employment rate was over 7%. it is down to 56%, mostly due to hiring searches at virginia tech university. and the number one city anthe most jobs is lafayette louisiana they boosted employment in the city by nearly 10%. the and plumbing rate is just about 4%, 1 of the lowest in the couny. already seen a big pickup in tourism. most of the new jobs, and the restaurant and retail industries. the big loser, where it -- losing three nap% of their workforce. you did notice that most of those cities are in the south. coming up, why investors ae ditching mutual funds, and what they are investing in. the federal government a mess. unable to give finans in order, but i states doing a better job? the results of the new report after the break. ♪ gerri: many state and lcal governments seem to be starting of
, mississippi. >> sure. >> or missouri, florida. >> missouri or florida, where we have all voted for aid for those people and they deserved it, and now we deserve it. >> what do you think happened this time around, that there was some sort of regional bias? >> well, i do think that some of my republican colleagues are trying to burnish their credentials against spending, and they want to perhaps see some offsets. you know, we don't need offsets in times of national emergencies or crisis. in the past 20 years this is already the longest any part of the country has had to wait in order to get any help from a natural disaster. it's already been 66 or 70 days, and this hasn't happened that long. with katrina we moved quickly. we've moved quickly in other places, and i would point out to my colleagues that states like new york and new jersey, we are donor states. we give more to the federal government than we get back in return. now we need the help, and so we need the help, and, you know, can you argue about what the federal government should be doing. no one should argue that the federal go
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)